No-Knead Crusty White Bread

No-Knead Crusty White Bread
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The most basic of all no-knead loaves, this is a wonderful way to get into yeast-bread baking. The easy stir-together dough rests in your refrigerator, developing flavor all the time, till you're ready to bake. About 90 minutes before you want to serve bread, grab a handful of dough, shape it, let it rise, then bake for 30 minutes. The result? Incredible, crusty artisan-style bread. If you're a first-time bread-baker, you'll never believe this bread came out of your own oven. If you're a seasoned yeastie, you'll love this recipe's simplicity.
No-Knead Crusty White Bread
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The most basic of all no-knead loaves, this is a wonderful way to get into yeast-bread baking. The easy stir-together dough rests in your refrigerator, developing flavor all the time, till you're ready to bake. About 90 minutes before you want to serve bread, grab a handful of dough, shape it, let it rise, then bake for 30 minutes. The result? Incredible, crusty artisan-style bread. If you're a first-time bread-baker, you'll never believe this bread came out of your own oven. If you're a seasoned yeastie, you'll love this recipe's simplicity.
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. The flour/liquid ratio is important in this recipe. If you measure flour by sprinkling it into your measuring cup, then gently sweeping off the excess, use 7 1/2 cups. If you measure flour by dipping your cup into the canister, then sweeping off the excess, use 6 1/2 cups. Most accurate of all, and guaranteed to give you the best results, if you measure flour by weight, use 32 ounces.
  2. Combine all of the ingredients in a large mixing bowl, or a large (6-quart), food-safe plastic bucket. For first-timers, "lukewarm" means about 105 degrees F, but don't stress over getting the temperatures exact here. Comfortably warm is fine; "OUCH, that's hot!" is not. Yeast is a living thing; treat it nicely.
  3. Mix and stir everything together to make a very sticky, rough dough. If you have a stand mixer, beat at medium speed with the beater blade for 30 to 60 seconds. If you don't have a mixer, just stir-stir-stir with a big spoon or dough whisk till everything is combined.
  4. Next, you're going to let the dough rise. If you've made the dough in a plastic bucket, you're all set - just let it stay there, covering the bucket with a lid or plastic wrap; a shower cap actually works well here. If you've made the dough in a bowl that's not at least 6-quart capacity, transfer it to a large bowl; it's going to rise a lot. There's no need to grease the bowl, though you can if you like; it makes it a bit easier to get the dough out when it's time to bake bread.
  5. Cover the bowl or bucket, and let the dough rise at room temperature for 2 hours. Then refrigerate it for at least 2 hours, or for up to about 7 days. (If you're pressed for time, skip the room-temperature rise, and stick it right into the fridge). The longer you keep it in the fridge, the tangier it'll get; if you chill it for 7 days, it will taste like sourdough. Over the course of the first day or so, it'll rise, then fall. That's OK; that's what it's supposed to do.
  6. When you're ready to make bread, sprinkle the top of the dough with flour; this will make it easier to grab a hunk. Grease your hands, and pull off about 1/4 to 1/3 of the dough - a 14-ounce to 19-ounce piece, if you have a scale. It'll be about the size of a softball, or a large grapefruit.
  7. Plop the sticky dough onto a floured work surface, and round it into a ball, or a longer log. Don't fuss around trying to make it perfect; just do the best you can.
  8. Place the dough on a piece of parchment (if you're going to use a baking stone); or onto a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Sift a light coating of flour over the top; this will help keep the dough moist as it rests before baking.
  9. Let the dough rise for about 45 to 60 minutes. It won't appear to rise upwards that much; rather, it'll seem to settle and expand. Preheat your oven (and baking stone, if you're using one) to 450 degrees F while the dough rests. Place a shallow metal or cast iron pan (not glass, Pyrex, or ceramic) on the lowest oven rack, and have 1 cup of hot water ready to go.
  10. When you're ready to bake, take a sharp knife and slash the bread 2 or 3 times, making a cut about 1/2" deep. The bread may deflate a bit; that's OK, it'll pick right up in the hot oven.
  11. Place the bread in the oven, and carefully pour the 1 cup hot water into the shallow pan on the rack beneath. It'll bubble and steam; close the oven door quickly.
  12. Bake the bread for 25 to 35 minutes, until it's a deep, golden brown.
  13. Remove the bread from the oven, and cool it on a rack. Store leftover bread in a plastic bag at room temperature.
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Reeses Peanut Butter Bar No Bake Bars

Reeses Peanut Butter Bar No Bake Bars
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Reeses Peanut Butter Bar No Bake Bars
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Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients, except chocolate chips in a medium sized bowl.
  2. Stir until the mixture is smooth and creamy
  3. Pour peanut butter mixture into a 9 x 13 pan.
  4. Melt chocolate chips in the microwave (at 50% power) for 1-2 minutes.
  5. Stir chocolate and pour over the peanut butter mixture.
  6. Spread chocolate with a spatula. To even out chocolate, tap pan on the counter.
  7. Refrigerate bars for one hour.
  8. Cut while bars are still cool.
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Red Lobster Cheddar Bay Biscuits

Red Lobster Cheddar Bay Biscuits
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Red Lobster Cheddar Bay Biscuits
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Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 450.
  2. Combine baking mix, water and grated cheese in a bowl. Roll out on a lightly floured surface, until 1 inch thick.
  3. Cut biscuits, and place on an ungreased pan.
  4. Melt butter and spices together.
  5. Brush the biscuits with the butter and bake for 8 to 10 minutes.
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Best Ever Banana Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

Best Ever Banana Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting
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Best Ever Banana Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting
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Ingredients
Frosting
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 275 degrees.
  2. Grease and flour a 9 x 13 pan.
  3. In a small bowl, mix mashed banana with the lemon juice; set aside.
  4. In a medium bowl, mix flour, baking soda and salt; set aside.
  5. In a large bowl, cream 3/4 cup butter and 2 1/8 cups sugar until light and fluffy.
  6. Beat in eggs, one at a time, then stir in 2 tsp vanilla.
  7. Beat in the flour mixture alternately with the buttermilk.
  8. Stir in banana mixture.
  9. Pour batter into prepared pan and bake in preheated oven for one hour or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
  10. Remove from oven and place directly into the freezer for 45 minutes. This will make the cake very moist.
  11. For the frosting, cream the butter and cream cheese until smooth.
  12. Beat in 1 teaspoon vanilla.
  13. Add icing sugar and beat on low speed until combined, then on high speed until frosting is smooth.
  14. Spread on cooled cake.
  15. Sprinkle chopped walnuts over top of the frosting, if desired.
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Pumpkin Cheese Ball

Pumpkin Cheese Ball
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Pumpkin Cheese Ball
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Ingredients
Instructions
  1. With a mixer, blend cream cheese with shredded cheddar, onion, salsa, cumin and minced jalapeno.
  2. Scoop onto plastic wrap and use the wrap to form the mixture into a 5-inch pumpkin-shaped ball
  3. Chill at least 2 hours.
  4. To serve, roll in crushed nacho-flavored tortilla chips and press a bell pepper stem into the top.
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Zucchini Brownies

Zucchini Brownies
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These are the BEST Zucchini brownies ever! They're ooey, gooey, and SUPER fudgy. And NO one will know they have zucchini inside!
Zucchini Brownies
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These are the BEST Zucchini brownies ever! They're ooey, gooey, and SUPER fudgy. And NO one will know they have zucchini inside!
Ingredients
FOR THE BROWNIES:
FOR THE FROSTING:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a 9x13" baking pan with foil and spray with cooking spray. Set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cocoa, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.
  3. Using an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, mix together the oil, sugar, and vanilla until well combined. Add the dry ingredients and stir. Fold in the zucchini. Let the mixture sit for a few minutes so the batter can absorb the moisture from the zucchini. Then, if your mixture is still very powdery, add up to 5 tablespoons water (start with 1 tablespoon and work up from there, stirring well after each addition). The batter will be very thick but shouldn't be powdery. (It partially depends on how wet your zucchini is!) Add walnuts, if desired. You may need to use your hands to work the water in instead of a spoon. The dough is super thick, like cookie dough. Do not add too much water! Spread in prepared pan.
  4. Bake 25-30 minutes until the brownies spring back when gently touched.
  5. To make the frosting: Whisk butter, cocoa, salt, and powdered sugar. Whisk in milk and vanilla. Spread over cooled brownies. Cut into squares and chill to semi-set. The frosting hardens slightly on the top but stays wet and gooey underneath.
  6. These brownies are best stored in an airtight container and eaten within 2 days. Chill them to make them last an extra day. They're what I call "fork" brownies because they are so gooey.
  7. *NOTE* People have been saying these brownies are cakey. Every time I've made them they turn out super fudgy like in the photos. The problem is how much water you add. It's hard to say how much to add because every time I've made these I've added a different amount. It really does depend on your zucchini. The batter will be very thick and need help spreading in the pan. If your batter is at all liquidy or thin you're going to get a more cakey brownie.
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